List of Internships

SUMMER 2022 INTERNSHIPS -- MORE LISTINGS COMING SOON!

Instructions for applying and link to application here

Check out the summer interns' Instagram (public_history_uva) for more information.

 

Danville, Virginia
Historical education research, program development
Description coming soon!
 
Gibbes Museum of Art 
Charleston, South Carolina
One internship available
Collections and exhibitions
Terms: The intern will be introduced to the day-to-day operations of a mid-sized art museum. This unique opportunity will be available to an undergraduate rising third- or fourth-year with a particular interest in American art and art history preferred. Background in art history, American studies, or museum studies is required. Curiosity, adaptability, and self-starter qualities are valued. Students who thrive in a cohesive, team-based environment, and who are excited by the possibilities of working closely across departments in a mid-size museum are ideal. Candidates under-represented in the museum field are strongly encouraged to apply. This internship pays $10 an hour for 300 hours of on-site work. 
Goals:  The intern will assist with the planning, development, and execution of special exhibitions and changes to the permanent collection galleries as well as activities related to collections management. Duties to include: the development of object checklists, creation of installation plans, loan initiation, and communication with artists and lenders. Additionally, assisting with annual collections inventory, cataloging new acquisitions, preparing works for outgoing loan, researching objects, and writing label copy for upcoming exhibitions and the mobile app will be part of the intern’s responsibilities.
Outcomes: Outcomes expected are an overall familiarity with museum collections care, policy and practice; familiarity with exhibitions planning, development and execution; and an understanding of museum values, ethics and goals in a professional team oriented environment that believes art museums serve as spaces for transformational community conversations.
About the Gibbes Museum: Located in the heart of downtown Charleston, South Carolina, the Gibbes Museum of Art is known for its dynamic exhibition programs and its exceptional collection of American art that provides a vibrant introduction to the visual culture of America and the American South from the colonial era to the present. The Museum presents six to eight special exhibitions annually, and organizes over 100 educational programs and events that respond to the region’s unique art history, Charleston's diverse demographics, and its reputation as a top tourist destination in the United States.
 
Remote position
Multimedia educational content creation, social media 
Description coming soon!
 
Charlottesville, VA
Collections and exhibitions
Description coming soon!
 
Library of Virginia 
Richmond, Va.
Educational website design and creation
Description coming soon!
 
Charlottesville, VA
Two internships available
Research and teaching assistants
Terms: We seek two upper-level undergraduate students with relevant coursework in American History and/or African American Studies to serve as research assistants for the 2021 Morven Summer Institute class, ARCH 4500/AAS 4559: Morven’s Enslaved and Descendant Communities (May 23-June 17). The interns will assist with (1) video documentation and social media posts of class activities, including field trips; (2) the transcription of archival materials, such as handwritten letters, wills, deeds, etc.; and (3) the cataloging of digital objects for ongoing research and curated displays. Experience with social media is a plus, but no prior experience or training in digital technology is required. Interns will be supervised by the course instructor, Dr. Scot French, a specialist in digital and public history. Internship start and end dates will be set by the supervisor. This internship pays $12 per hour for 240 hours over the course of 8-10 weeks (25-30 hours per week).
Goals: Our primary goal for these paired internships are: (1) to document class activities through video and social media and build public awareness/support for ongoing research and site interpretation at Morven; and (2) to build a digital archive of student- and faculty-generated research (scanned documents, transcriptions, bibliographies, etc.) and related presentations/reports for use in ongoing research and curated displays. Interns will have an opportunity to work with 19th century historical records, such as newspaper advertisements, handwritten letters, wills, and deeds.
Outcomes: Interns will contribute to video and social media documentation of the summer class and the development of an accessible/searchable digital repository of student- and faculty-generated materials that will help tell the story of Morven’s enslaved and descendant communities. Interns will gain valuable experience in videography and social media, historical research, and digital humanities tools/methods.
About: The 2,913-acre UVA Foundation-owned property known today as Morven has a complex, multi-layered history spanning thousands of years of human occupation. Located in southwestern Albemarle County, not far from Monticello, the site has attracted new interest from researchers since its acquisition by UVA in 2001. Today, Morven is home to a multi-disciplinary research and teaching initiative known as the Morven Summer Institute. ARCH 4500/AAS 4559 Morven’s Enslaved and Descendant Communities (May 23-June 17) invites students to explore the lives and labors of African Americans at Morven through a combination of lectures, discussions, field trips, and guided research. Led by co-instructors Lenora McQueen and Scot French, students will learn about each of the site’s distinct periods of occupation, from 17th and 18th century Monacan Indian encampments to the British land grant era of the Carter Estate (1730s-1790s), post-Revolutionary Era experiments in small-scale tenant farming and agricultural reform at William Short’s “Indian Camp” (1790s-1810s), and the rise of large-scale plantation slavery under David Higginbotham (1820s-1853) and D.G. Smith (1853-1865). Students will also explore the post-emancipation transition to free labor systems (sharecropping, tenancy, wage labor) and the formation of descendant communities throughout Albemarle County. Students will maintain research blogs, work in small groups to examine/interpret primary sources, report new findings, and produce a multimedia or poster-style project for public presentation at Morven.
 
Charlottesville and Louisa County, Va.
Archival research and digitization
Description coming soon!
 
Prince William County Historic Preservation Division
Prince William, Virginia
Archival research, database creation, written report
Description coming soon!
 
Scottsville, Virginia
Museum collections project
Description coming soon!
 
Charlottesville, VA
One internship available
Legal Knowledge Podcast
Terms: The Special Collections department of the UVA Law Library seeks a graduate student or advanced undergraduate student to produce a history-themed podcast. The podcast, currently titled Legal Knowledge, is inspired by the Law School’s forthcoming book (UVA Press) that explores the transformation of legal education at UVA from the Law School’s founding in 1819 to the present. The book brings together contributors from UVA and other institutions who write on topics such as teaching the laws of slavery, women in the legal curriculum, and students as change agents during the Civil Rights Movement. The podcast will promote the project via a limited series in which we interview each contributor about their respective chapter. In addition, the intern will assist with research and related tasks for the manuscript as needed and in support of the podcast. The intern must have strong research and organization skills and enjoy working in a collaborative environment. Experience with audio editing software, such as Adobe Audacity, is beneficial but not required. This internship pays $15/hr. for 300 hours of work.
Goals: Alongside the Law Library’s Special Collections team, the intern will assist with all aspects of the Legal Knowledge podcast. These responsibilities could include drafting questions and prompts, creating episode outlines, scheduling interviews, editing and mastering each episode, and producing episode transcripts. The intern may also conduct primary and secondary research at the UVA Law Library and other UVA repositories, in accordance with health and safety guidelines.
Outcome: The final product of this internship will be the creation of a podcast that consists of a series of five to ten interviews on the Law School’s history. The internship will offer professional development in historical research, podcast production, public history, and team-based project work in an institutional and academic archive.
About Law Special Collections: The UVA School of Law was founded in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson and is the second oldest continuously running law school in the United States. Law Special Collections is the institutional repository for the UVA School of Law and preserves and provides access to a diverse archive of legal history materials. Our collections include rare books, manuscripts, archival records and publications, faculty writing, and photographs. An important part of our mission is preserving, researching, and making accessible the history of the UVA School of Law.
 
Charlottesville, Virginia
Internships in Charlottesville, Richmond, Manassas, Fredericksburg, and Vicksburg TN
Vicksburg, Mississippi
Terms: In partnership with the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, the Vicksburg National Military Park is seeking an undergraduate or a graduate intern with a background in nineteenth-century American history to work at the national park. Internship start and end dates will be determined by the NPS supervisor. This internship pays $10 an hour—$4,800 for the summer (40 hrs a week for 12 weeks, and includes housing)
Goals: Duties will be determined by conversations between staff at the Park and at UVA's Nau Civil War Center and may include historical research, frontline interpretation, and content development for the park website, NPS app, and social media sites. Potential areas of focus include untold stores, US Colored Troops, public memory, and Occupation /Reconstruction. The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship. The summer internship includes housing at the Park.
About the National Military Park: Vicksburg National Military Park protects close to 2,000 acres in and around the city of Vicksburg, MS, commemorating the story of the siege of Vicksburg from May 18-July 4, 1863. Both Union and Confederate governments saw the vital importance in Vicksburg and its location for controlling the Mississippi River. Victory here gave the Union army control of the Mississippi River throughout the rest of the Civil War. The Military Park includes 1,325 historic monuments and markers, making it one of the largest collections of outdoor art in the world. The Military Park also tells the story of the occupation and post-war period of Reconstruction in Vicksburg. This is a unique time in the history of the park as it is in the initial stages of an expansion to manage new sites to better protect and interpret the larger Vicksburg Campaign.
 
Fredericksburg, Virginia
Terms: In partnership with the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park is seeking an undergraduate or a graduate intern with a background in nineteenth-century American history to work at the national park. This internship pays $10 an hour—$4,800 for the summer (40 hrs a week for 12 weeks, and includes housing). Internships start and end dates will be determined by the NPS supervisor. This internship is generously funded by the Carl Sewell family.
Goals: Duties will be determined by conversations between staff at the Park and at UVA's Nau Civil War Center and could include research, engagement with visitors to the Park, and preparation of historical papers, and work for the NPS websites.  The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship. The summer internship includes housing at the Park.
About the National Military Park: The National Park Service unit headquartered in Fredericksburg encompasses four major Civil War battlefields, cemeteries containing soldiers from the United States and the Confederacy, monuments from the commemorative era, and historic structures dating from the 18th through the 19th century. The site interprets a wide range of events, including the battles of Fredericksburg (1862) Chancellorsville (1863), the Wilderness (1864), and Spotsylvania (1864); the experience of black and white refugees; the trauma of civilians caught in the path of war; and postwar activities that recalled and interpreted the conflict.
 
Internship #3: Manassas National Battlefield Park  
Manassas, Virginia
Terms: In partnership with the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, the Manassas National Battlefield Park is seeking an undergraduate or a graduate intern with a background in nineteenth-century American history to work at the national park. Internship start and end dates will be determined by the NPS supervisor. This internship pays $10 an hour—$4,800 for the summer (40 hrs a week for 12 weeks, and includes housing).
Goals: Duties will be determined by conversations between staff at the Park and at UVA's Nau Civil War Center and may include historical research, frontline interpretation, content development for the park website and social media sites, and curatorial assistance with routine museum housekeeping.  The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship. The summer internship includes housing at the Park.
About the National Battlefield Park: Manassas National Battlefield Park comprises approximately 5,000 acres and preserves the site of two major battles of the American Civil War – the First and Second Battles of Manassas (Bull Run).  Among the park’s historic features are multiple 19th century structures, military and civilian cemeteries, and commemorative monuments.  Areas of interpretive emphasis include: the military events surrounding the First and Second Battles of Manassas (1861 & 1862); how the two battles reflect the transformation of the Civil War in purpose, scale, and method; the experience of civilians, both free and enslaved; and the memorialization of the battlefield landscape.
 
Appomattox, Virginia
Terms: In partnership with the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, Appomattox Court House National Historical Park is seeking an undergraduate or a graduate intern with a background in nineteenth-century American history to work at the national park. Internship start and end dates will be determined by the NPS supervisor. This internship pays $10 an hour—$4,800 for the summer (40 hrs a week for 12 weeks, and includes housing).
Goals: Duties will be determined by conversations between staff at the Park and at UVA's Nau Civil War Center to assist the park’s Curator and Historian.  In the curatorial realm the intern will assist the museum technician and the museum curator with routine housekeeping, and environmental monitoring in historic houses, exhibit spaces, and collection storage areas. The intern will also assist museum staff with conducting the mandatory Annual Inventory of Museum Property and help correct deficiencies in locations and documentation. The intern will learn to safely handle museum objects while unpacking and packing museum objects for storage, exhibits, or loans, as well as work on cataloging artifacts for the Park’s collection.  For the Park Historian the intern will research and begin compiling a master list of Appomattox Campaign casualties.  This will also include up updating the Appomattox Court House casualty list.  Some transcription work of letters and diaries may also occur. The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship. The summer internship includes housing at the Park. 
About the National Military Park: The National Park Service unit at Appomattox Court House encompasses 1,700 acres, including the historic village and two Civil War battlefields, numerous cemeteries—military and civilian, several monuments from the commemorative era, and historic structures dating from to the 19th century. The site interprets a wide range of events, including the Appomattox Campaign; the battles of Appomattox Station and Appomattox Court House; the African American and white civilian experience; the surrender and the events/results stemming from the surrender on April 9, 1865.
 
Charlottesville, Virginia
Terms: Undergraduate student with strong research and writing skills, with a background in American history and familiarity with the local history of Albemarle County and the City of Charlottesville a plus. The intern will work directly under the ACHS’s Executive Director and Programs & Volunteers Coordinator and work closely with the ACHS’s Research Librarian. The intern will research and write articles and pages to be published on the cvillpedia.org wiki, focused on local history during the Civil War and the 19th century. Workspace will be provided in our Downtown Charlottesville office, but the intern will have the ability to work remotely if needed. This internship pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer (30 hrs a week for 10 weeks).
Goals: Primary responsibilities include research in ACHS’s library, other local libraries as needed, and online digital databases, and writing articles for cvillepedia.org about local history during the Civil War and the 19th century. The intern will work with ACHS staff to assess relevant archival resources held in the Society’s collections that may be digitized and made accessible online. The intern may be asked to staff the Society’s library periodically and assist library patrons with their research. At the end of the summer, the intern will present on their work in an online program, and take part in a cvillepedia.org user cultivation event as a trainer.
Outcome: ACHS staff and the intern will work together to determine specific historical subjects, topics, events, people, etc. that the intern will create articles and pages for cvillepedia.org. At the end of the summer, the intern will have added a significant number of pages and articles to the site, and understand the processes involved with researching and writing for a local history wiki. The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship.
Background: The ACHS has served the local community for over 80 years. The role of the Society throughout this time has been to collect, preserve, and interpret local history. We envision a new role for local historical societies in the twenty-first century, embracing technology and digital archives to expand accessibility to historical information. Cvillepedia was created by Charlottesville Tomorrow in 2009 and has grown to be a source for community knowledge and history of the people, places, and events in Charlottesville and Albemarle County. The ACHS, in partnership with Charlottesville Tomorrow and the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library, is initiating a comprehensive strategic plan for Cvillepedia’s future—to facilitate improvement and expansion through community partnerships, to ensure the site is an equitably accessible archive for local history, and to envision the platform as a community-driven historical resource for and by local citizens that benefits the whole community. The scope of information currently found within Cvillepedia is heavily weighted towards more modern history and current events. The ACHS proposes to use Cvillepedia as a platform to provide access to the historical records and materials found in our collections, and elsewhere, and cultivating local community users to create this information.
 
Charlottesville, Virginia
Research in historical records
Terms: Undergraduate student intern will conduct research on the cemetery’s early decades (1873-1900), in particular on the people buried in the cemetery who were born before or during the Civil War. Another focus will be the histories of the founders of the cemetery. This internship pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer.
Goals: The cemetery, a unique form of built landscape, offers a rich and largely unexplored site for documenting and interpreting the history of enslaved and free blacks in Charlottesville both before and after Emancipation. Founded during Reconstruction by the Daughters of Zion Society, a sororal organization, the private cemetery provided a dignified alternative to the segregated Oakwood Cemetery across the street; as such, it offers a unique framework for interpreting the history of the antebellum African Americans who founded self-help organizations and promoted African-American commerce, education, and entrepreneurship during Reconstruction. It also provides material for closer analysis of sororal African-American organizations, which have not received as much attention as their fraternal counterparts.
Outcomes: The intern will work closely with a UVA faculty member, as well as the Preservers of the Daughters of Zion Cemetery, to develop specific outcomes for the internship, which may include written research reports. The chief outcome will be new, primary research that amplifies the Civil War and Reconstruction history of the cemetery, and by extension, Charlottesville. The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship.
About Daughters of Zion Cemetery: The cemetery was founded in 1873 by a group of African-American women who wanted to provide private burial services and a cemetery for black Charlottesvillians. The Daughters of Zion Society also owned a community center, called Zion Hall, which housed many local civic and religious groups and events. After decades of neglect, another group of committed local women, the Preservers of the Daughters of Zion Cemetery, formed in 2015 to restore the cemetery. Their approach to restoration, which includes restoring its public memory as well as its physical beauty, constitutes a new paradigm for presenting the public history of African-American spaces.
  
Richmond, VA
One internship available for undergraduate student. This internship pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer. Description coming soon!
 
Charlottesville, Va.
Research assistants
Description coming soon!