List of Internships

SUMMER 2020 INTERNSHIPS - ALL POSITIONS FILLED OR CANCELLED AS OF 4/27/20.
 
The Institute for Public History offers the following paid internship opportunities to undergraduates, May graduates, and graduate students at the University of Virginia during summer 2020. This list will continue to be updated with new internships until the application deadline on Feb. 28.
Students may apply from any major, department, or field.
Applications must be submitted via a email to Lisa Goff, lg6t@virginia.edu, by 11:59 p.m. on Friday, February 28, 2020. Successful applicants will be notified via email by late March or early April.
Applications and instructions are available here.
 
Please note:
*Internships are open to May graduates, upper-level undergraduates, and graduate students as indicated in listings.
*Some start and end dates—as well as breaks for vacation—are negotiable, while others are not. If you have non-negotiable dates when you cannot work, indicate those on your application.  
*Federal payroll taxes (Social Security and Medicare) totaling approximately 6% of gross income are taken out of all stipends. Paychecks will be adjusted so that the stated stipend covers all payroll taxes. (I.e., if the stated stipend is $3,000, the amount you actually receive will be about $2,750.)
*As internships are filled in March and April, that will be noted on the listing as “Position/s Filled.”
 
Danville Museum of Fine Art and History, History-Video Project   ******POSITION FILLED******
Danville, Virginia
One internship available
Archival research, digital formatting, collection and content management
Terms: The museum seeks a well-organized undergraduate or graduate student (May graduate also fine) who is interested in revealing unrepresented African American histories in Danville, Virginia, and in particular how those histories relate to the Sutherlin Mansion, a house museum that holds a Civil Rights exhibition and a Civil War exhibition. The museum will be working with local historian Gary Grant and national historians Dr. Grace Hale and Dr. Fitzhugh Brundage to reconstruct the content of the museum’s controversial visitor information video, which omits vital histories. Strong writing skills essential. A familiarity with digital collection management tools, especially Past Perfect, is a plus, but training can also be provided. This internship pays $10 an hour (for 300 office hours) —roughly $3,000 for the summer. Food and lodging subsidies available for students commuting to Danville (overnight stays in the research center’s residency quarters [House 126], plus a meal stipend to Crema &Vine, a coffee shop across the street from the museum).
Goals: Add African American narratives from the Civil War era and Civil Rights movement to the history of the Sutherlin Mansion by updating the visitor information video to include, for example, a 1960 sit-in by black students demanding the end of segregation at the public library, which was was housed in the mansion at the time. Intern will assist historians researching the new content and will help produce the reformatted video.
Outcome: The intern will begin the process of identifying, recording and transcribing the content provided by historians. This will be a process of synopsizing, and organizing the content and providing colligated information to all parties on the team. At the end of the internship the student will write a 4- to 5-page overview of how the content was academically and locally supported and how it might be of use to other small house museums. As time permits, they will also be involved in discussions about a long-term data management strategy for papers related to the integrating of omitted histories for future reference by small house museums.
About the DMFAH History-Video Project: Produced in partnership with the Center for Community Engagement & Career Competitiveness (CCECC) and History United, a community coalition, the museum’s Visitor Service Video Project unites the work of community and national historians, archaeologists, and preservationists to reconstruct omitted histories at the the Sutherlin Mansion.
 
Encyclopedia Virginia    ******POSITION FILLED******
Charlottesville, Virginia
One internship available
Editorial assistant
Terms: Encyclopedia Virginia (EV) is an authoritative and user-friendly resource on the history and culture of Virginia. We are seeking a graduate student with a background in public history or American Studies to assist our editorial team in our mission of telling the inclusive story of Virginia. In addition to helping prepare edited entries for publication, the intern will assist the EV editorial team in developing a framework and protocol for evaluating previously published entries to ensure that they reflect the best and most current scholarship and language. They will then take the lead in auditing published entries, with a focus on our entries on colonial and Virginia Indian history, and recommending improvements. The intern should demonstrate an interest in digital publishing, strong analytic and writing skills, and the ability to work independently. This internship pays $16 an hour; roughly $4,800 for the entire summer (300 hours).
Goals: This intern will help develop a framework and protocol for evaluating and improving published content, audit existing entries on colonial and Virginia Indian history and make recommendations, and assist with publishing entries by writing summary paragraphs, creating timelines, and using the content management system.
Outcome: The intern will become familiar with editorial practices at a leading digital humanities publication, gain experience editing and publishing historical writing for a general audience, and insight into project management.
About Encyclopedia Virginia (EV): Published by Virginia Humanities, Encyclopedia Virginia (EV) is a free, reliable multimedia resource that tells the inclusive story of Virginia for students, teachers, and communities that seek to understand how the past informs the present and future.
 
Gibbes Museum of Art  ******POSITION CANCELLED******
Charleston, South Carolina
One internship available
Collections management and curatorial research
Terms: An undergraduate or graduate student with a particular interest in American art history. Background in art history, American studies, Historic Preservation or museum studies is required. Intern must provide own housing. This internship pays $7.25/hr, roughly $2,050 for the summer.  
Goals: An internship at the Gibbes Museum of Art in summer 2020 will provide a collections-focused experience while also exposing the intern to other Museum departments providing insight into institution-wide project management.  This summer the Gibbes will begin its fourth year of being open after a  major renovation and expansion (completed in 2016). We have settled into our building and are actively creating unique experiences for visitors and patrons in our expanded gallery spaces, artist studios and classrooms and state-of-the art Collections Storage Center. The UVA intern will work with Curatorial and Collections Department staff (Director of Collections, Director of Curatorial Affairs, Assistant Curator and Preparator) on a variety of projects related to collection and exhibition planning and management.
Outcome: The intern will be expected to complete specific curatorial and collection tasks which may include: assisting with annual collection inventory, cataloging new acquisitions, preparing works for outgoing loan, researching and writing label copy for upcoming exhibitions, and preparing brief reports with representative samples of work. At the end of the summer, the intern will have a broad understanding of curatorial and collection management procedures at an art museum.
About the Gibbes Museum: Opened in 1905 by the Carolina Art Association, the Gibbes Museum of Art represents a long and impressive tradition of cultural leadership in historic Charleston, providing residents and visitors with access to a distinguished collection and an active, schedule of exhibits, programs and events. The nationally significant collection of American paintings reflects Charleston's past and present and is a source of community pride. From portraits and landscapes of the Colonial South to the era of Porgy and Bess to significant works by contemporary artists such as Kara Walker and Jasper Johns, visitors come face-to-face with the history of Charleston and art in the south.  Of special importance at the Gibbes is the country's premiere collection of over 600 jewel-like miniature portraits. The Gibbes collection consists of approximately 8,000 objects ranging from paintings, prints and drawings, to photography, sculpture and archival materials.
http://www.gibbesmuseum.org/
 
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, Va.
Several internships available 
Digital history, website development, archival research
Terms: Advanced undergraduate or graduate student with background in American history. The intern will work with the Jefferson's University: The Early Life project team on creating and expanding a UVA Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH)-sponsored digital humanities archive and website on the early history of the University of Virginia. This will involve professional transcription/editing of historical documents and XML keying of already digitized and transcribed documents. Intern should demonstrate strong organizational and analytic skills, ability to work independently, and write clearly. This internship pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer.
Goals: Primary responsibilities include professional documentary transcription (we will train first), proofreading, XML mark-up of digitized and transcribed documents, and writing of descriptive primary document-based essays.
Outcome: The intern will be expected to complete specific tasks as outlined above. At the end of the summer, the intern will have a detailed understanding of both the technical processes involved in the digital humanities and the early history of the University of Virginia. 
About JUEL: The "Jefferson's University--Early Life Project, 1819-1870" (JUEL) was cofounded by Kirt von Daacke, Associate Professor of History and Assistant Dean, College of Arts and Sciences; and Maurie McInnis, former Professor of Art History and Vice Provost for Academic Affairs at UVa and now Provost of the University of Texas-Austin. JUEL is funded by The Jefferson Trust, an Initiative of the University of Virginia Alumni Association, and the University of Virginia. It is housed within the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH).

http://juel.iath.virginia.edu/

Library of Virginia    ******POSITION CANCELLED******
Richmond, Va.
One internship available
Online resource guide
Terms: The Library of Virginia seeks a graduate student intern to help create an online resource guide to Asian Pacific Islander resources at the Library. Intern must provide own transportation to and housing in Richmond. This internship pays $15/hr for graduate students, or roughly $4,500 for 300 hours of work.
Goals: Using WordPress and/or Omeka, an online content management system, the intern will develop an online guide to Library resources related to Asian Pacific Islander communities and heritage in Virginia. The guide will live on the edu.lva.virginia.gov website. This new resource is part of an ongoing Library initiative to strengthen relationships with immigrant and refugee communities who increasingly represent a diversified Virginia.
Outcome: The online guide to Asian Pacific Islander resources is part of a larger project that will also include a series of programs and pop-up exhibitions to meet Initiative #1 of the LVA's 2019-2023 Strategic Plan to "reimagine a collecting model that is cooperative and proactive, builds relationship that bring value, helps build capacity where possible, and reflects those who are shaping 21st century Virginia."
Background: The Library of Virginia is one of the oldest agencies of Virginia government, founded in 1823 to preserve and provide access to the state's incomparable printed and manuscript holdings. Our collection, which has grown steadily through the years, is the most comprehensive resource in the world for the study of Virginia history, culture, and government.
http://www.lva.virginia.gov/about/
 
 
James Monroe’s Highland     *****POSITION CANCELLED******
Charlottesville, Virginia
One internship available
Public archaeology internship
Terms: We seek an advanced undergraduate student who has completed archaeological coursework and preferably field experience, though the intern is not expected to lead excavations this summer. The student should enjoy engaging with visitors of all ages and backgrounds, and should possess a demonstrated ability to convey nuanced information to the public. This internship pays $10/hr for 300 hours over the summer—roughly $3,000.
Goals and outcomes: This public archaeology internship will focus on interpretation of the Monroes’ 1799 main house, whose archaeological remains were recently identified. The intern will conduct public interface surrounding archaeology, archaeological discoveries at Highland, and the public tour experience. The exact range of duties for the internship will depend on the receipt of external funding for a summer archaeological field season at Highland. With an active field project, the intern will be a key liaison with the public on site during excavation. Without funding for an excavation season, the intern will utilize existing archaeological data to create and present programs for the public.
About James Monroe’s Highland: Highland is a historic site in Albemarle County, Virginia, and is a division of William & Mary. Highland’s public interpretation was revolutionized in 2016 with the announcement of the results of a recent multi-disciplinary research campaign, which discovered the lost and forgotten main house and correctly identified the presidential guesthouse built in 1818. The newly discovered remains reveal a sizeable, freestanding house as the Monroes’ main residence. Part of a large chimney base, several sections of stone-wall foundations, and segments of thicker walls belonging to a stone cellar have been uncovered and point to a house fire that likely destroyed the house as early as c.1830.
 
Monticello     ******POSITION FILLED******
Charlottesville, Va.
One internship available
Public Archaeology Intern
Terms: The Department of Archaeology at Monticello seeks an advanced undergraduate or graduate student with experience or interest in archaeology, 18th- and 19th-century American history, and public outreach. The intern will work with the archaeology staff to oversee, organize, and create archaeology programs for the public related to recent and ongoing archaeological excavations at Monticello. This internship pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer.
Goals: Primary responsibilities will include serving as the department liaison for all summer archaeology programs; leading the archaeology day of Monticello’s summer camp; assisting with plantation walking tours, Let’s Go Dig Family Workshop, and Archaeology Teacher’s Workshop; and provide material for social media related to aforementioned programs. In addition, the intern will work with the project team to develop a new public archaeology program tailored to the applicant’s interest and background. New programs could include the development of an educational unit for K-12 teachers, a new artifact display for outreach days, or a new public tour.
Outcome: The internship will offer the undergraduate or graduate student professional development opportunities in archaeology, American history, outreach, and team-based program management.
About Monticello: Monticello Plantation was home to Thomas Jefferson, his family, and hundreds of enslaved African Americans and their families from 1770 until Jefferson’s death in 1826. Monticello’s multidisciplinary educational initiatives are conducted through the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies (ICJS). As part of the ICJS, the Department of Archaeology is dedicated to studying and preserving Monticello's archaeological record and deciphering its meaning through comparative research. The Department’s primary research focus is the social, economic, and ecological dynamics of the 5000-acre plantation, occupied by Jefferson and his family, and to scores of free workmen and hundreds of enslaved African-Americans and their families, whose skills and labor powered Jefferson’s agricultural and industrial enterprises. The Department is home to the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery, an Internet-based initiative designed to foster collaborative research and data sharing among archaeologists. It also houses extensive artifact collections from past and ongoing archaeological fieldwork at Monticello and offers numerous public programs and workshops about current excavations and archaeological methodology.
 
One Shared Story   ******POSITION FILLED******
Charlottesville and Louisa County, Va.
One internship available
Archival research and digitization
Terms: Advanced undergraduate with interest in doing hands-on research in historic documents. Background in American history a plus. Applicants should have an interest in digital humanities and GIS and a desire to work with local communities to provide support for preserving, protecting and promoting their stories. Intern must provide own transportation to/from Louisa County. This internship pays $10/hr for 300 hours over the summer—roughly $3,000. 
Goals and Outcomes: One Shared Story works in Central Virginia to uncover documents of hidden history and make them publicly accessible. We will be scanning fragile historic documents in local collections (Louisa, Fluvanna, Orange) and loading these documents to our online digital archive. The selected candidate will be using scanners, organizing files, creating metadata, and working with community volunteers to develop data from the documents. Data development will include local volunteer transcriptions of documents and use of the ArcGIS platform to add spatial information where available. ESRI's configurable Story Maps will be used to curate archive items and/or data.
About One Shared Story: Our mission is to expand what we know about the past so we can better understand the present and work together to create compassionate inclusive communities for the future. To that end, we combine archival and genealogical research with digital mapping technologies to create publicly accessible databases devoted to African American history in Central Virginia. So far our work has concentrated on Louisa County and Buckingham County. Upcoming projects include using ArcGIS technology to map Emancipation-era cemeteries in Buckingham County, and researching public records related to slavery and Reconstruction in Louisa County.
 
Scottsville Museum and Historic Landmarks Foundation   ******POSITION CANCELLED******
Scottsville, Virginia
Museum database project  
Terms: Seeking an advanced undergraduate student with an interest in history as revealed by artifacts, who has computer skills and a passion for organization. Personal transportation is required, as part of the project involves work at the Scottsville Museum (there is a budgeted stipend for mileage). There will also be some research which may be done via home computer and scanning which can be done at the University of Virginia’s art library under the supervision of one of our Board Members. This internship pays $10/hr for 300 hours over the summer—roughly $3,000. 
Goals: As a small-town museum with a limited budget, the Scottsville Museum is run by volunteers. We have a disparate collection of artifacts, all received as gifts, and it can be a challenge to marshall them into a coherent exhibition. The last big push to sort out what we have was ten years ago, when we acquired the software, Past Perfect, and began to compile a digital record of our collection. This project lapsed when its instigators left the area, and now we need to update our database, including items received since that time, and to think about where these objects play a role in telling our town’s story. We also need to deepen our historical research on certain artifacts, update some items never properly catalogued, and update the storage of  existing and new collection items.
Outcome: With the guidance of three of the members of the Museum Board, the intern will be trained in the use of Past Perfect and undertake the project of adding part of the collection to the database. He or she will also undertake some research to illuminate the significance of some objects, which will form the basis for a small exhibition at the Museum, ideally opening in the fall. In addition, the intern will write a four- to five-page report reviewing the summer’s work and give a brief report to the Scottsville Museum Board of Directors at its August 2019 meeting.
About the Scottsville Museum and Historic Landmarks Foundation: We are a nonprofit, incorporated organization which seeks to preserve for the public benefit the historical, natural, and artistic heritage of the Scottsville community of southern Albemarle County. It is housed in a former Disciples of Christ Church, built in 1846, and its adjacent parsonage, the Barclay House. The latter building has been renovated to create research and meeting space, and to house technical systems, archives, library, and storage space. The Museum is on Main Street in downtown Scottsville. It displays permanent and rotating exhibits relating to the town and its history. It is open to the public on weekends from April to October, and by appointment at other times. Should a prospective intern be interested in visiting the Museum, a private tour can be arranged by contacting Connie Geary at smuseum@avenue.org.
 
UVA Law Library: Special Collections and Archives   ******BOTH POSITIONS FILLED******
Charlottesville, VA
Two internships available
Internship #1: Law School oral history program   ******POSITION FILLED******
Terms: The Special Collections department of the UVA Law Library seeks a graduate student or advanced undergraduate student to help re-launch the Law School’s oral history program. Within the program’s broader goal of preserving the Law School’s institutional history, this internship will focus on interviews with women faculty, staff, and alumnae to expand the perspectives included in our archive and to coincide with the 2020 centennial of coeducation at the Law School. Previous experience with an oral history projects or related classwork preferred. The intern must have strong research and organizational skills and enjoy working in a collaborative environment. This internship pays $12.50/hr for undergraduates and $15/hr for graduate students.
Goals:  Alongside the Law Library’s Special Collections Librarian, the intern will assist with all aspects of the oral history program. These responsibilities could include formulating program policies, identifying people for interviews, conducting background research, drafting interview questions, overseeing the digitization of previous law school oral histories from the 1980s, and building collaborative relationships with other UVA oral history programs on Grounds.
Outcome: The internship will offer professional development in oral history work, historical research, digital preservation of video and audio materials, and team-based project work in an institutional and academic archive.
About Law Special Collections: The UVA School of Law was founded in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson and is the second-oldest continuously running law school in the United States. Law Special Collections is the institutional repository for the UVA School of Law and preserves and provides access to a diverse archive of legal history materials. Our collections include rare books, manuscripts, archival records and publications, faculty writing, and photographs. An important part of our mission is preserving, researching, and making accessible the history of the UVA School of Law.
 
Internship #2: Digital Historical Collections   ******POSITION FILLED******
Terms: The Special Collections and Archives department of the Arthur J. Morris Law Library seeks an advanced undergraduate student or graduate student intern with experience or interest in modern American history, librarianship, and the creation of digital archives. The intern will work closely with the Digital Collections Librarian, Special Collections Librarian, and the Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities on a digital archives-based initiative. The intern will select their primary focus from among a list of available projects based on the candidate’s previous technical ability, her/his educational interests, and the law library’s institutional priorities. Possible initiatives include: the History of Slavery and the Law at UVA, Charlottesville Statues Legal History Research Guide, the Scottish Court of Session Digital Archive, 1970s & 1980s Federal Marijuana Policy, 1828 Catalogue, the history of the Legal Curriculum at UVA, and the Diaries of William Minor Lile, among others. The intern must have strong research and organizational skills and enjoy working in a collaborative environment. This internship pays $12.50/hr for undergraduates and $15/hr for graduate students.
Goals: The intern will work with the project team to develop the needs of her/his selected project and develop a project plan. This internship will likely involve project management, materials curation, digitization and preservation of rare materials, metadata development and creation, rich description and contextualization of historical materials, the creation of databases and websites derived from summer research.
Outcome: The internship will offer student professional development opportunities in the digital humanities, digital history, and team-based project development. The intern will write some short blog-post reflections on his/her work during the summer and make a public presentation to the Library community upon the completion of her/his tenure.  
Background: The Law Library is a leader in the creation of digital archival projects in the legal archival community. By digitizing and making these works easily available to the public, the project aims to create new research opportunities in the history of early American law and legal education. In addition, it seeks to build a model for other institutions interested in expanding the digital presence of their rare book collections.   
About Law Special Collections: The UVA School of Law was founded in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson and is the second-oldest continuously running law school in the United States. Law Special Collections is the institutional repository for the UVA School of Law and preserves and provides access to a diverse archive of legal history materials. Our collections include rare books, manuscripts, archival records and publications, faculty writing, and photographs. An important part of our mission is preserving, researching, and making accessible the history of the UVA School of Law.
 
UVA Nau Center for Civil War History   ******ALL POSITIONS FILLED******
Charlottesville, Virginia
Five to six internships available in Charlottesville, Richmond, and Fredericksburg
Internship #1: Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park    ******POSITION FILLED******
Fredericksburg, Virginia
Terms: In partnership with the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park is seeking an undergraduate intern with a background in nineteenth-century American history to work at the national park. Internship start and end dates will be determined by the NPS supervisor. This internship, generously funded by the Carl Sewell family, pays $10 an hour—$4,800 for the summer (40 hrs a week for 12 weeks).
Goals: Duties will be determined by conversations between staff at the Park and at UVA's Nau Civil War Center and could include research, engagement with visitors to the Park, and preparation of historical papers, and work for the NPS websites. The summer internship includes housing at the Park.
About the National Military Park: The National Park Service unit headquartered in Fredericksburg encompasses four major Civil War battlefields, cemeteries containing soldiers from the United States and the Confederacy, monuments from the commemorative era, and historic structures dating from the 18th through the 19th century. The site interprets a wide range of events, including the battles of Fredericksburg (1862) Chancellorsville (1863), the Wilderness (1864), and Spotsylvania (1864); the experience of black and white refugees; the trauma of civilians caught in the path of war; and postwar activities that recalled and interpreted the conflict.
 
Richmond, Virginia
Terms: In partnership with the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, the Richmond National Battlefield Park and Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site is seeking an undergraduate intern with a background in nineteenth-century American history to work at the national park. Internship start and end dates will be determined by the NPS supervisor. This internship pays $10 an hour—$4,800 for the summer (40 hrs a week for 12 weeks).
Goals: Duties will be determined by conversations between staff at the NPS units and at UVA's Nau Civil War Center and could include research, engagement with visitors, preparation of historical papers, and work for the NPS websites. The summer internship includes housing on Park Service land.
About the National Park Service sites: These two National Park Service units headquartered in Richmond administer several major Civil War battlefields from 1862 and 1864-65, the Chimborazo Medical Museum, prisoner-of-war installations, portions of the Tredegar industrial site, several national cemeteries, monuments from the commemorative era, historic structures from the 18th and 19th centuries, and the Maggie L. Walker house. The two sites interpret military events and civilian life during the Civil War, the process of emancipation, race relations during Reconstruction and the late 19th century, and the development of commemorative traditions relating to the war.
 
Internship #3: Appomattox Court House National Historical Park   ******POSITION FILLED******
Appomattox, Virginia
Terms: In partnership with the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, Appomattox Court House National Historical Park is seeking an undergraduate intern with a background in nineteenth-century American history to work at the national park. This internship pays $10 an hour--$4,800 for the summer (40 hrs a week for 12 weeks). Internships start and end dates will be determined by the NPS supervisor.
Goals: Duties will be determined by conversations between staff at the Park and at UVA's Nau Civil War Center to assist the park’s Curator and Historian.  In the curatorial realm the intern will assist the museum technician and the museum curator with routine housekeeping, integrated pest management (IPM) monitoring, and environmental monitoring in historic houses, exhibit spaces, and collection storage areas. The intern will also assist museum staff with conducting the mandatory Annual Inventory of Museum Property and help correct deficiencies in locations and documentation. The intern will learn to safely handle museum objects while unpacking and packing museum objects for storage, exhibits, or loans, as well as work on cataloging artifacts for the Park’s collection.  For the Park Historian the intern will research and begin compiling a master list of Appomattox Campaign casualties.  This will also include up updating the Appomattox Court House casualty list.  Some transcription work of letters and diaries may also occur. The summer internship includes housing at the Park.
About the National Military Park: The National Park Service unit at Appomattox Court House encompasses 1,700 acres, including the historic village and two Civil War battlefields, numerous cemeteries—military and civilian, several monuments from the commemorative era, and historic structures dating from to the 19th century. The site interprets a wide range of events, including the Appomattox Campaign; the battles of Appomattox Station and Appomattox Court House; the African American and white civilian experience; the surrender and the events/results stemming from the surrender on April 9, 1865.
 
Internship #4: Nau Civil War Center Digital Research    ******POSITION FILLED******
Charlottesville, Virginia
Digital history, archival research
Terms: Undergraduate student with background in American history. The intern will work directly under the Nau Center's digital historian assisting in efforts to gather data and information as part of the Center's various digital projects. Interns will primarily work on a digital database related to Dr. Caroline Janney’s new study of paroled Confederate soldiers in the wake of General Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Courthouse in April 1865. Additional work may include studying black Civil War soldiers from Albemarle County and UVA students who fought for the Union. Intern should demonstrate strong organizational and analytic skills, ability to work independently, and write clearly. This internship, generously funded by the Lockhart family, pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer (30 hrs a week for 10 weeks).
Goals: Primary responsibilities include data entry, research in digital databases and at UVA's Special Collections Library, writing essays about the Civil War and the 19th century, and other tasks to be determined in conjunction with Dr. William Kurtz, the Nau Center’s digital historian.
Outcome: The intern will be expected to complete specific tasks as outlined above. At the end of the summer, the intern will have an understanding of the technical processes involved in the digital humanities and have practical experience in researching the American Civil War.
Background: Dr. Caroline Janney’s study of demobilization of the Confederate army in Virginia began at Purdue University. Her extensive database of thousands of Confederate parolees now resides at UVA and is being readied for digital publication. Our studies of "UVA Unionists" and "Black Virginians in Blue" began in 2015 as a way to tell another side of our local community's Civil War story, which in the past often has been dominated by the Confederate "Lost Cause" narrative. Very little is known about what black men from central Virginia did during the conflict and we hope to uncover a larger story tracing their lives from the antebellum period, to the war, to Reconstruction and the end of the century. Similarly, UVA students who fought for the Union were left out of the university's Civil War story.
 
Internship #5: Virginia Museum of History and Culture   ******POSITION FILLED******
Richmond, Virginia
Manuscripts processing, Civil War archives 
Terms: Upper-level undergraduate student with a strong history background; familiarity with Virginia Civil War and social history a plus. Accuracy and attention to detail required. This internship pays $10 an hour--roughly $3,000 for the summer.
Goals: Duties will include sorting, arranging, analyzing, re-housing, and describing Civil War-era papers.
Outcome: Under the supervision of archival team members, the intern will be part of a major effort to process a significant group of Civil War-era manuscripts, with the goal of producing finding aids that will guide researchers to the materials.
Background: The Virginia Museum of History and Culture (formerly Virginia Historical Society) maintains a strong commitment to educational outreach, exhibitions, and other programming, but is perhaps best known for its research library and collections. Those collections include manuscripts (personal and family papers, business and organizational records), printed materials and rare books, and museum artifacts. A commitment to preservation of and access to its richest resources has led to an initiative to process these materials.
 
Internship #6: Daughters of Zion Cemetery    ******POSITION FILLED******
Charlottesville, Virginia
Research in historical records, website design and maintenance
Terms: The intern will conduct research on the cemetery’s early decades (1873-1900), in particular on the people buried in the cemetery who were born before or during the Civil War. Another focus will be the histories of the founders of the cemetery. This internship pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer.
Goals: The cemetery, a unique form of built landscape, offers a rich and largely unexplored site for documenting and interpreting the history of enslaved and free blacks in Charlottesville both before and after Emancipation. Founded during Reconstruction by the Daughters of Zion Society, a sororal organization, the private cemetery provided a dignified alternative to the segregated Oakwood Cemetery across the street; as such, it offers a unique framework for interpreting the history of the antebellum African Americans who founded self-help organizations and promoted African-American commerce, education, and entrepreneurship during Reconstruction. It also provides material for closer analysis of sororal African-American organizations, which have not received as much attention as their fraternal counterparts.
Outcomes: The intern will work closely with a UVA faculty member, as well as the Preservers of the Daughters of Zion Cemetery, to develop specific outcomes for the internship, which may include a website and written research reports. The chief outcome will be new, primary research that amplifies the Civil War and Reconstruction history of the cemetery, and by extension, Charlottesville.
About Daughters of Zion Cemetery: The cemetery was founded in 1873 by a group of African-American women who wanted to provide private burial services and a cemetery for black Charlottesvillians. The Daughters of Zion Society also owned a community center, called Zion Hall, which housed many local civic and religious groups and events. After decades of neglect, another group of committed local women, the Preservers of the Daughters of Zion Cemetery, formed in 2015 to restore the cemetery. Their approach to restoration, which includes restoring its public memory as well as its physical beauty, constitutes a new paradigm for presenting the public history of African-American spaces.
 
Charlottesville, Va.
Four-five internships available for undergraduates and graduate students
Research assistants
Terms: Advanced undergraduates or graduate students with background in American history, History or American Studies major preferred. The intern will work with the President’s Commission on the University in the Age of Segregation on the history of the University of Virginia, 1865-1965. This will involve archival research, document photographing, and professional transcription/editing of historical documents. Intern should demonstrate strong organizational and analytic skills, ability to work independently, and write clearly. These internships pay $10 an hour for undergrads and $15/hr for graduate students.
Goals: Primary responsibilities include archival research, document photographing, and professional documentary transcription (we will train first), proofreading, and writing of descriptive primary document-based essays as part of the university’s public confronting of its own difficult past.
Outcome: The intern will be expected to complete specific tasks as outlined above. At the end of the summer, the intern will have a detailed understanding of both the technical processes involved in archival research, public history, and the post-1865 history of the University of Virginia.
About the Age of Segregation Commission: The President’s Commission on the University in the Age of Segregation will explore and report on UVA’s historical relationship with the era of segregation, especially as it connects to the Charlottesville/Albemarle community. It is co-directed by Andrea Douglas, Executive Director of the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, and Kirt von Daacke, Professor (History) and Assistant Dean, College of Arts & Sciences.
Oral histories inventory: segregation in Charlottesville
Terms: Graduate student with background in American history, History, or American Studies to research and produce a master list of oral histories related to the age of segregation that have been produced locally. This internship pays $15 an hour for a graduate student.
Goals: The intern will compile an inventory of oral histories conducted locally, but externally to UVA. Sources might include county historical societies, local libraries, and schools. The inventory will explore the availability of details such as names of interviewees, number interviewed, original formats (reel-to-reel, cassette, VHS, CD, DVD, print transcriptions), and location of originals.
Outcome: This inventory will facilitate ongoing decisions about conducting new oral histories related to the age of segregation, as well as decisions related to seeking permission to digitize, transcribe, or share existing oral histories.
 
 
Virginia Museum of History and Culture   ******BOTH POSITIONS FILLED******
Richmond, Va.
Two internships available
Internship #1: Archival processing assistant, corporate records   ******POSITION FILLED******
Terms: Upper-level undergraduate student interested in business history or museum administration. Accuracy and attention to detail required. Legible handwriting is required. Flexible schedule within the Institution’s 9-5 M-F open hours. Intern must provide own housing. This internship pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer.
Goals: Duties will include helping to organize and process the records of a Virginia museum founded in the 1820s. Intern will help inventory, organize and rehouse materials, and update existing indices and finding aids to improve access to the archive and thus highlight its research potential. This internship pays $15/hr for up to 300 hours.
 Outcome: Under the supervision of archival team members, the intern will be part of a major effort to provide better access to and preserve the archives of the Virginia Historical Society. Materials include architectural plans, correspondence, curatorial and exhibition files, facility reports, marketing and fund-raising materials, minutes, publications, etc.
About the VMHC: The Virginia Museum of History and Culture (formerly the Virginia Historical Society) maintains a strong commitment to educational outreach, exhibitions, and other programming, but is perhaps best known for its research library and collections. Those collections include manuscripts (personal and family papers, business and organizational records), printed materials and rare books, and museum artifacts. Among those important holdings are the records of the VMHC itself, documenting the efforts of the founders’ to preserve the records of the Revolutionary period, the institution’s survival through the Civil War, its search for a permanent home, the development of the museum collection and related programming, and the challenges it faces as it navigates the 21st century.
 
Internship #2: Manuscripts processing, Civil War archives   ******POSITION FILLED******
Terms: Upper-level undergraduate student with a strong history background; familiarity with Virginia Civil War and social history a plus. Accuracy and attention to detail required. This internship is funded by the Nau Center for Civil War History at UVA. This internship pays $10 an hour--roughly $3,000 for the summer.
Goals: Duties will include sorting, arranging, analyzing, re-housing, and describing Civil War-era papers.
Outcome: Under the supervision of archival team members, the intern will be part of a major effort to process a significant group of Civil War-era manuscripts, with the goal of producing finding aids that will guide researchers to the materials.
Background: The Virginia Museum of History and Culture (formerly Virginia Historical Society) maintains a strong commitment to educational outreach, exhibitions, and other programming, but is perhaps best known for its research library and collections. Those collections include manuscripts (personal and family papers, business and organizational records), printed materials and rare books, and museum artifacts. A commitment to preservation of and access to its richest resources has led to an initiative to process these materials.