List of Internships

SUMMER 2021 INTERNSHIPS - ALL POSITIONS FILLED

The Institute for Public History offers the following paid internship opportunities to undergraduates, May graduates, and graduate students at the University of Virginia during summer 2020. This list will continue to be updated with new internships until the application deadline.
Students may apply from any major, department, or field.
Applications must be submitted via a email to Lisa Goff, lg6t@virginia.edu, by 11:59 p.m. on Friday, March 5, 2021. Successful applicants will be notified via email by late March or early April.
Applications and instructions are available here.
 
Please note:
*Internships are open to May graduates, upper-level undergraduates, and graduate students as indicated in listings.
*Some start and end dates—as well as breaks for vacation—are negotiable, while others are not. If you have non-negotiable dates when you cannot work, indicate those on your application.  
*ALL INTERNSHIPS MUST BE COMPLETED OVER THE SUMMER, BEFORE CLASSES BEGIN AGAIN IN THE FALL.
*Federal payroll taxes (Social Security and Medicare) totaling approximately 6% of gross income are taken out of all stipends. Paychecks will be adjusted so that the stated stipend covers all payroll taxes. (I.e., if the stated stipend is $3,000, the amount you actually receive will be about $2,750.)
*As internships are filled in March and April, that will be noted on the listing as “Position/s Filled.”
 
Danville, Virginia
One internship available
Historical education research, program development, and signage
Terms: The museum seeks a well-organized undergraduate or graduate student (May graduate also fine) who is interested in revealing unrepresented African American and Native American histories in Danville, Virginia. The intern/s will work on historical education research and program development, as well as updated curation and signage for the museum’s current collections. This internship pays $10 an hour (for 300 on-site hours)—roughly $3,000 for the summer. Food and lodging subsidies may be available for students who do not live in, or would be commuting to Danville.
Goals: The Danville Museum is in the process of pivoting from a Confederate house museum to a community regional museum that tells a complete story of the Dan River region’s history. A summer intern would assist in three top priorities: histories of African Americans and Native Americans, and labor history. The Museum is currently part of the Virginia Civil War Trail and is applying to be added to the Civil Rights Trail
Outcomes: The museum will work with the intern/s to assign them to projects that fit their skills and interests. Potential projects include:
* updating the language on the Civil War museum displays.
* rewriting materials for the Holbrook-Ross District tour of Danville, which covers the professional African-American neighborhood created shortly after the Civil War.
* converting hard copy files to digital Past Perfect files.
* working with the Carter G. Woodson education committee to integrate African American and Native American histories into our education offerings for the public schools and for the public.
* working on an exhibit about agriculture in Pittsylvania County that incorporates objects salvaged from the Tobacco and Textile Museum; funded by the Smithsonian CROSSROADS/Museum on Main program.
* digitizing film, video and audio cassettes as part of a grant funded by CLIR (Council on Library & Information Services).
Background: The Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History, established in 1974, is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to promote art, history, and culture in the Dan River Region. Its Board of Directors’ vision is to be the Dan River Region’s leader for integrated awareness of history, culture, and community. Located on Main Street in the heart of Danville, Virginia with its beautiful Sutherlin Mansion and grounds, the Museum serves as a hub of learning and celebrations, connecting area colleges, medical campuses, schools, historic districts, and a thriving Downtown River District.
 
Gibbes Museum of Art - POSITION FILLED
Charleston, South Carolina
One internship available
Collections and exhibitions
Terms: The intern will be introduced to the day-to-day operations of a mid-sized art museum. This unique opportunity will be available to an undergraduate rising junior or senior with a particular interest in American art and art history preferred. Background in art history, American studies, or museum studies is required. Curiosity, adaptability, and self-starter qualities are valued. Students who thrive in a cohesive, team-based environment, and who are excited by the possibilities of working closely across departments in a mid-size museum are ideal. Candidates under-represented in the museum field are strongly encouraged to apply. This internship pays $10 an hour for 300 hours of on-site work. 
Goals:  The intern will be exposed to the professional policies and practices that guide museums. In this position the intern will work closely with senior curatorial and collections teams in the planning, development and execution of special exhibitions, the rotation of the permanent collection galleries, and overall collections care and interpretation.
Outcomes: The intern will assist with the planning, development, and execution of special exhibitions and changes to the permanent collection galleries as well as activities related to collections management. Duties to include: the development of object checklists, creation of installation plans, loan initiation, and communication with artists and lenders. Additionally, assisting with annual collections inventory, cataloging new acquisitions, preparing works for outgoing loan, researching objects, and writing label copy for upcoming exhibitions and the mobile app will be part of the intern’s responsibilities. Outcomes expected are an overall familiarity with museum collections care, policy and practice; familiarity with exhibitions planning, development and execution; and an understanding of museum values, ethics and goals in a professional team oriented environment that believes art museums serve as spaces for transformational community conversations.
About the Gibbes Museum: Opened in 1905 by the Carolina Art Association, the Gibbes Museum of Art represents a long and impressive tradition of cultural leadership in historic Charleston, providing residents and visitors with access to a distinguished collection and an active, schedule of exhibits, programs and events. The Gibbes is known for its dynamic exhibition programs and its exceptional collection of American art that provides a vibrant introduction to the visual culture of America and the American South from the colonial era to the present,  The Gibbes is located in the heart of downtown Charleston, South Carolina. The Museum presents six to eight special exhibitions annually, and organizes over 100 educational programs and events that respond to the region’s unique art history, Charleston's diverse demographics, and its reputation as a top tourist destination in the United States.
 
Library of Virginia - POSITION FILLED
Richmond, Va.
One internship available
Educational website design and creation
Terms: The Library of Virginia, a state agency with incomparable collections that document the people and history of Virginia, seeks an undergraduate intern to create an online educational resource, “Virginia’s Constitutions,” accessible through the LVA Education Web site, www.edu.lva.virginia.gov, as part of the 50th anniversary commemoration of Virginia’s current constitution. The intern should be familiar with digital humanities tools. Remote work is possible.This internship pays $10 an hour, roughly $3,000 for the summer (30 hrs a week for 10 weeks between June and August). 
Goals: “Virginia’s Constitutions” will use an open source online content management system, such as WordPress, as the framework for an online education resource that examines themes such as how Virginia’s government has or has not become more equitable over time; how the Virginia state constitutions have empowered or excluded Virginians over time; or how often should the state constitution be changed and should change require a convention and plebiscite. The resource should be an attractive, easy-to-use, dynamic tool for educators and students.
Outcome: The intern will create a visually appealing resource with text, images, and other materials, including links to audio and video files, archival records, and other images from the LVA collection. Using stories of Virginians is a useful tool for engaging educators and students. At least one data visualization is expected. The web site should also have a moderated comments section. The intern will work in collaboration with LVA staff, including exhibitions coordinator, education staff, graphic designers, social media coordinator, IT, and editorial staff to review, discuss, and plan content of the resource. Accomplishing these goals requires computer skills and a good design sense as well as critical thinking, experience with historical research, and excellent writing skills to craft a creative presentation that will engage the education community as well as the general public. The project manager will be Barbara C. Batson, exhibitions coordinator.
About the Library of Virginia: Located in downtown Richmond, the Library was created by the General Assembly in 1823 to organize, care for, and manage the state's growing collection of books and official records. The collections illustrate the rich and varied past of the commonwealth, documenting the lives of Virginians whose deeds are known to all, as well as those of ordinary citizens whose accomplishments are the foundation of our heritage. The Library provides educational programs and resources on Virginia history and culture for students and teachers, and offers the public a wide array of exhibitions, lectures, book-signings, and other programs, supplies research and reference assistance to state officials, provides consulting services to state and local government agencies and to Virginia's public libraries, and administers numerous federal, state, and local grant programs.
 
One Shared Story - POSITIONS FILLED
Charlottesville and Louisa County, Va.
Three internships available
Archival research and digitization (TENTATIVE FOCUS)
Terms: Advanced undergraduate with interest in doing hands-on research in historic documents. Background in American history a plus. Applicants should have an interest in digital humanities and GIS and a desire to work with local communities to provide support for preserving, protecting and promoting their stories. Intern must provide own transportation to/from Louisa County. This internship pays $10/hr for 300 hours over the summer—roughly $3,000. 
Goals and Outcomes: One Shared Story works in Central Virginia to uncover documents of hidden history and make them publicly accessible. We will be scanning fragile historic documents in local collections (Louisa, Fluvanna, Orange) and loading these documents to our online digital archive. The selected candidate will be using scanners, organizing files, creating metadata, and working with community volunteers to develop data from the documents. Data development will include local volunteer transcriptions of documents and use of the ArcGIS platform to add spatial information where available. ESRI's configurable Story Maps will be used to curate archive items and/or data.
About One Shared Story: Our mission is to expand what we know about the past so we can better understand the present and work together to create compassionate inclusive communities for the future. To that end, we combine archival and genealogical research with digital mapping technologies to create publicly accessible databases devoted to African American history in Central Virginia. So far our work has concentrated on Louisa County and Buckingham County. Upcoming projects include using ArcGIS technology to map Emancipation-era cemeteries in Buckingham County, and researching public records related to slavery and Reconstruction in Louisa County.
 
Prince William County Historic Preservation Division- POSITION FILLED
Prince William, Virginia
One internship available 
Archival research, database creation, written report
Terms: Prince William County Historical Commission in partnership with the County Archaeologist and the Historic Preservation Division, is seeking an intern (preferably a graduate student) to conduct archival research and prepare a history, for publication, on services provided to the indigent in Prince William County, Virginia. The intern needs to demonstrate a capability to work independently; possess strong oral and written communications skills; and strong organizational skills. The candidate must have access to housing and transportation to the office and research repositories (see list below). Attendance at and reporting to the Prince William County Historical Commission during its regularly scheduled monthly meeting is required. The intern’s work space will be available in the Planning Office, at 5 County Complex Court, Suite 210, Prince William, VA, and possibly in the offices of the Historic Preservation Division, in the Williams Ordinary at 17674 Main Street, Dumfries, VA 22026. This internship pays $15/hr for 300 hours over the summer—roughly $4,500. 
Goals: The methods used in Prince William County to handle those considered indigent changed over the centuries, and the intern will research and document these changes. From the 1790s to the 1920s the county operated a poor house that was located within the modern boundaries of Prince William Forest Park. Despite the county courthouse moving multiple times during this period, the poor house remained in a permanent position. After 1920, the District Home was opened in Manassas and served Prince William, Arlington, and Fairfax counties and the city of Alexandria. In the 20th century the District evolved into Birmingham Green. Research repositories where the intern will do research include: Prince William Forest National Park, a division of the National Park Services; RELIC room of Bull Run Regional Library; Prince William County Courthouse; Library of Virginia, Richmond; National Archives and Library of Congress, D.C.
Outcome: The intern will prepare a work plan and review with county staff; conduct archival research, including primary source materials as well as secondary research materials, on services provided for the indigent in Prince William County; prepare a definition of “indigent” and an historic context or contexts; create a database with findings from archival research to determine any historical trends in who the County defined as indigent and how they were treated; prepare a written history for publication.
 
Scottsville Museum - POSITION FILLED
Scottsville, Virginia
One internship available
Museum collections project
Terms: Seeking an advanced undergraduate student with an interest in history as revealed by material culture, who has computer skills and a passion for organization. Personal transportation is required, as part of the project involves work at the Scottsville Museum (there is a stipend for mileage). There will also be some research which may be done via home computer and scanning which can be done at the University of Virginia’s art library under the supervision of one of our Board Members. The internship will be June 15 to August 15, including a formal presentation to the board. This internship pays $10/hour (undergraduate) $12-$15/hour (graduate) + mileage reimbursement. 
Goals:  The Scottsville Museum is a small-town museum with a limited budget run by volunteers. We have a disparate collection of artifacts, nearly all received as gifts, and it can be a challenge to marshall them into a coherent exhibition. The last big push to sort out what we have was ten years ago, when we acquired the software, Past Perfect, and began to compile a digital record of our collection. This project lapsed when its instigators left the area, and now we need to update our database with new software, including recent acquisitions. We also need to scan print items not currently in our database and add them under specific subject headings. The newly catalogued items should be stored so that they can be found easily. We want to deepen our historical research on certain artifacts and to think about the role they play in telling our town’s story.
Outcome: With the guidance of three of the members of the Museum Board, the intern will be trained in the use of Past Perfect and undertake the project of adding items in the collection to the database. They will also undertake some research to illuminate the significance of some objects, which will form the basis for a small exhibition at the Museum, ideally opening in the fall. In addition, the intern will write a four- to five-page report reviewing the summer’s work and give a brief report to the Scottsville Museum Board of Directors at its August 2020 meeting.
Background: The Scottsville Museum and Historic Landmarks Foundation is a nonprofit, incorporated organization which seeks to preserve for the public benefit the historical, natural, and artistic heritage of the Scottsville community of southern Albemarle County. It is housed in a former Disciples of Christ Church, built in 1846, and its adjacent parsonage, the Barclay House. The latter building has been renovated to create research and meeting space, and to house technical systems, archives, library, and storage space. The Museum is on Main Street in downtown Scottsville. It displays permanent and rotating exhibits relating to the town and its history. It is open to the public on weekends from April to October, and by appointment at other times. Should a prospective intern be interested in visiting the Museum, a private tour can be arranged by contacting Connie Geary at smuseum@avenue.org.
 
UVA Blandy Experimental Farm - POSITION FILLED
Boyce, VA
One internship available
Historical archive creation
Terms: We are seeking an upper-level undergraduate or graduate student with a strong background in American history. A background in African American history is a plus. The intern will carry out research to help document the history of the peoples who were enslaved prior to the end of the Civil War on the land that is now home to University of Virginia’s Blandy Experimental Farm. The intern will be supervised by Dr. Kyle Haynes, Associate Director of Blandy Experimental Farm. For an undergraduate, the position will pay $10 per hour for 300 hours over the summer (roughly $3,000). For a graduate student, the position will pay $15 per hour for 300 hours over the summer (roughly $4,500). Free housing will be available at Blandy throughout the summer.
Goals: The goal is to locate, digitize, systematically store, and provide a written summary of available documentary materials that will serve as a foundation for a comprehensive historical analysis of the history of enslaved peoples at the site. Of particular interest are details about the enslaved peoples – their names, family histories, their numbers, and the types of duties they were forced to carry out. The intern will access sources of historical documents including those held by historical societies, county governments, and possibly documents prepared by the plantation owners.
Outcome: The outcome of this project will be a catalogued and accessible digital repository, along with a written summary of the contents of the repository, that will help tell the story of the peoples who were enslaved at the site. The intern will gain valuable experience in historical research, digital historical preservation, and writing.
About Blandy Experimental Farm: In the early 1800s, the Tuley family established a plantation known as “The Tuleyries” and profited from the forced labor of Black enslaved peoples until the Civil War. In 1903, Graham Blandy, who made his fortune as a stockbroker in New York, purchased the Tuleyries property. In 1926, upon the death of Graham Blandy, 700 acres of Blandy’s property was bequeathed to UVA and was named “Blandy Experimental Farm”. Today, Blandy Experimental Farm is a vital field station for UVA, with two primary missions – environmental research and environmental education.
 
Charlottesville, VA
Two internships available
I. Rare Book Shelf Reading - POSITION FILLED
Terms: The Special Collections department of the UVA Law Library seeks a graduate student or advanced undergraduate student to conduct a shelf reading/inventory of our rare book collection, which includes about 12,000 items from the 15th to 19th centuries. Working with our Special Collections teams, the intern will systematically review a portion of this collection to make sure that all of the books that should be there are present. Using protocols established by projects such as Book Traces @ UVA, this process will capture information particular to each copy, such as signatures, gift information, unique markings, or other artifactual features. The intern will also assist in research to determine if some of our rare book copies were once part of UVA’s original Rotunda library, which new evidence suggests is likely. As a contributor to the Law Library’s 1828 Catalogue Project in this research, the intern will review books in our rare collection for known Rotunda markings. Previous experience with rare books or related bibliographic classwork preferred. Along the way, the intern will have time and encouragement to post about work and findings on the Law Library blog or social media platforms. The intern must have strong research and organizational skills and enjoy working in a collaborative environment. This internship can be adapted if a fully remote situation is required. This internship pays $15/hr for roughly 300 hours of work. 
Goals:  In collaboration with the Law Library’s Special Collections team, the intern will assist with all aspects of the rare book shelf reading and Rotunda library research. These responsibilities will include systematically reviewing individual rare book copies for unique and/or Rotunda markings, as well as checking them against the library catalog to identify missing, misplaced, or miscataloged materials. Other responsibilities could include conducting research on specific rare book titles, building collaborative relationships with other UVA bibliographic programs on Grounds, and producing a short blog post or research report on summer work that will appear on the Law Library’s blog or 1828 Catalogue project website.
Outcome: The internship will offer professional development in rare book research and cataloging, historical research and writing, and team-based project work in an institutional and academic archive.
About Law Special Collections: The UVA School of Law was founded in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson and is the second-oldest continuously running law school in the United States. Law Special Collections is the institutional repository for the UVA School of Law and preserves and provides access to a diverse archive of legal history materials. Our collections include rare books, manuscripts, archival records and publications, faculty writing, and photographs. An important part of our mission is preserving, researching, and making accessible the history of the UVA School of Law.
 
II. Landscape history of North Grounds - POSITION FILLED
Terms: The Special Collections department of the UVA Law Library seeks a graduate student or advanced undergraduate student to research and create a web-based historical walking tour of the Law School’s current site on North Grounds. This work will contribute to Law Special Collections’ ongoing project to investigate the Law School’s historical connections to slavery. The Law School’s North Grounds site was once owned by the Duke family and known as Sunnyside. The University still owns the land with the extant Duke house, and the Rivanna trail passes through this now wooded area. Topics for research include the lives and labors of the many enslaved people who lived at this site, historical uses of this land, the Albemarle County poor house, for which stone foundations still remain on the site, and the Cool Springs Barbecue Club, which held its barbecues on this site after the Civil War. The intern must have strong research and organizational skills and enjoy working in a collaborative environment. This internship can be adapted if a fully remote situation is required. This internship pays $15/hr. for roughly 300 hours of work. 
Goals:  Alongside the Law Library’s Special Collections team, the intern will assist with all aspects of this landscape history and web project. These responsibilities could include conducting primary and secondary research on the North Grounds landscape at the UVA Law Library and other UVA repositories, in accordance with health and safety guidelines; working with GIS software and data to map the site and begin to build a website devoted to this history; and writing up research findings in a report or as web content.
Outcome: The final product of this internship will be the creation of a digital interface such as a website or mobile app that would provide a walking tour of this historical landscape. The internship will offer professional development in historical research, web or app design and creation, public history, and team-based project work in an institutional and academic archive.
About Law Special Collections: The UVA School of Law was founded in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson and is the second-oldest continuously running law school in the United States. Law Special Collections is the institutional repository for the UVA School of Law and preserves and provides access to a diverse archive of legal history materials. Our collections include rare books, manuscripts, archival records and publications, faculty writing, and photographs. An important part of our mission is preserving, researching, and making accessible the history of the UVA School of Law.
 
Charlottesville, Virginia
Seven internships in Charlottesville, Richmond, Manassas, Mt. Vernon, and Fredericksburg
Fredericksburg, Virginia
Terms: In partnership with the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park is seeking an undergraduate intern with a background in nineteenth-century American history to work at the national park. This internship pays $10 an hour—$4,800 for the summer (40 hrs a week for 12 weeks). Internships start and end dates will be determined by the NPS supervisor. This internship is generously funded by the Carl Sewell family.
Goals: Duties will be determined by conversations between staff at the Park and at UVA's Nau Civil War Center and could include research, engagement with visitors to the Park, and preparation of historical papers, and work for the NPS websites.  The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship. The summer internship includes housing at the Park.
About the National Military Park: The National Park Service unit headquartered in Fredericksburg encompasses four major Civil War battlefields, cemeteries containing soldiers from the United States and the Confederacy, monuments from the commemorative era, and historic structures dating from the 18th through the 19th century. The site interprets a wide range of events, including the battles of Fredericksburg (1862) Chancellorsville (1863), the Wilderness (1864), and Spotsylvania (1864); the experience of black and white refugees; the trauma of civilians caught in the path of war; and postwar activities that recalled and interpreted the conflict.
 
Internship #2: Nau Civil War Center Digital Research - POSITION FILLED
Charlottesville, Virginia
Terms: Undergraduate student with background in American history. The intern will work directly under the Nau Center's digital historian assisting in efforts to gather data and information as part of the Center's various digital projects. Interns will primarily work on a digital database related to Dr. Caroline Janney’s new study of paroled Confederate soldiers in the wake of General Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Courthouse in April 1865. Additional work may include studying black Civil War soldiers from Albemarle County and UVA students who fought for the Union. Intern should demonstrate strong organizational and analytic skills, ability to work independently, and write clearly. This internship pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer (30 hrs a week for 10 weeks). This internship is generously funded by the Lockhart family.
Goals: Primary responsibilities include data entry, research in digital databases and at UVA's Special Collections Library, writing essays about the Civil War and the 19th century, and other tasks to be determined in conjunction with Dr. William Kurtz, the Nau Center’s digital historian.
Outcome: The intern will be expected to complete specific tasks as outlined above. At the end of the summer, the intern will have an understanding of the technical processes involved in the digital humanities and have practical experience in researching the American Civil War. The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship.
Background: Dr. Caroline Janney’s study of demobilization of the Confederate army in Virginia began at Purdue University. Her extensive database of thousands of Confederate parolees now resides at UVA and is being readied for digital publication. Our studies of "UVA Unionists" and "Black Virginians in Blue" began in 2015 as a way to tell another side of our local community's Civil War story, which in the past often has been dominated by the Confederate "Lost Cause" narrative. Very little is known about what black men from central Virginia did during the conflict and we hope to uncover a larger story tracing their lives from the antebellum period, to the war, to Reconstruction and the end of the century. Similarly, UVA students who fought for the Union were left out of the university's Civil War story.
 
Internship #3: Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society (ACHS) and Cvillepedia.org - - POSITION FILLED
Charlottesville, Virginia
Terms: Undergraduate student with strong research and writing skills, with a background in American history and familiarity with the local history of Albemarle County and the City of Charlottesville a plus. The intern will work directly under the ACHS’s Executive Director and Programs & Volunteers Coordinator and work closely with the ACHS’s Research Librarian. The intern will research and write articles and pages to be published on the cvillpedia.org wiki, focused on local history during the Civil War and the 19th century. Workspace will be provided in our Downtown Charlottesville office, but the intern will have the ability to work remotely if needed. This internship pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer (30 hrs a week for 10 weeks).
Goals: Primary responsibilities include research in ACHS’s library, other local libraries as needed, and online digital databases, and writing articles for cvillepedia.org about local history during the Civil War and the 19th century. The intern will work with ACHS staff to assess relevant archival resources held in the Society’s collections that may be digitized and made accessible online. The intern may be asked to staff the Society’s library periodically and assist library patrons with their research. At the end of the summer, the intern will present on their work in an online program.
Outcome: ACHS staff and the intern will work together to determine specific historical subjects, topics, events, people, etc. that the intern will create articles and pages for cvillepedia.org. At the end of the summer, the intern will have added a significant number of pages and articles to the site, and understand the processes involved with researching and writing for a local history wiki. The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship.
Background: The ACHS has served the local community for over 80 years. The role of the Society throughout this time has been to collect, preserve, and interpret local history. We envision a new role for local historical societies in the twenty-first century, embracing technology and digital archives to expand accessibility to historical information. Cvillepedia was created by Charlottesville Tomorrow in 2009 and has grown to be a source for community knowledge and history of the people, places, and events in Charlottesville and Albemarle County. The ACHS, in partnership with Charlottesville Tomorrow and the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library, is initiating a comprehensive strategic plan for Cvillepedia’s future—to facilitate improvement and expansion through community partnerships, to ensure the site is an equitably accessible archive for local history, and to envision the platform as a community-driven historical resource for and by local citizens that benefits the whole community. The scope of information currently found within Cvillepedia is heavily weighted towards more modern history and current events. The ACHS proposes to use Cvillepedia as a platform to provide access to the historical records and materials found in our collections, and elsewhere, and cultivating local community users to create this information.
 
Internship #4: Daughters of Zion Cemetery - POSITION FILLED
Charlottesville, Virginia
Research in historical records
Terms: The intern will conduct research on the cemetery’s early decades (1873-1900), in particular on the people buried in the cemetery who were born before or during the Civil War. Another focus will be the histories of the founders of the cemetery. This internship pays $10 an hour—roughly $3,000 for the summer.
Goals: The cemetery, a unique form of built landscape, offers a rich and largely unexplored site for documenting and interpreting the history of enslaved and free blacks in Charlottesville both before and after Emancipation. Founded during Reconstruction by the Daughters of Zion Society, a sororal organization, the private cemetery provided a dignified alternative to the segregated Oakwood Cemetery across the street; as such, it offers a unique framework for interpreting the history of the antebellum African Americans who founded self-help organizations and promoted African-American commerce, education, and entrepreneurship during Reconstruction. It also provides material for closer analysis of sororal African-American organizations, which have not received as much attention as their fraternal counterparts.
Outcomes: The intern will work closely with a UVA faculty member, as well as the Preservers of the Daughters of Zion Cemetery, to develop specific outcomes for the internship, which may include written research reports. The chief outcome will be new, primary research that amplifies the Civil War and Reconstruction history of the cemetery, and by extension, Charlottesville. The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship.
About Daughters of Zion Cemetery: The cemetery was founded in 1873 by a group of African-American women who wanted to provide private burial services and a cemetery for black Charlottesvillians. The Daughters of Zion Society also owned a community center, called Zion Hall, which housed many local civic and religious groups and events. After decades of neglect, another group of committed local women, the Preservers of the Daughters of Zion Cemetery, formed in 2015 to restore the cemetery. Their approach to restoration, which includes restoring its public memory as well as its physical beauty, constitutes a new paradigm for presenting the public history of African-American spaces.
 
Internship #5: Appomattox Court House National Historical Park - POSITION FILLED
Appomattox, Virginia
Terms: In partnership with the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, Appomattox Court House National Historical Park is seeking an undergraduate intern with a background in nineteenth-century American history to work at the national park. This internship pays $10 an hour—$4,800 for the summer (40 hrs a week for 12 weeks). Internships start and end dates will be determined by the NPS supervisor.
Goals: Duties will be determined by conversations between staff at the Park and at UVA's Nau Civil War Center to assist the park’s Curator and Historian.  In the curatorial realm the intern will assist the museum technician and the museum curator with routine housekeeping, and environmental monitoring in historic houses, exhibit spaces, and collection storage areas. The intern will also assist museum staff with conducting the mandatory Annual Inventory of Museum Property and help correct deficiencies in locations and documentation. The intern will learn to safely handle museum objects while unpacking and packing museum objects for storage, exhibits, or loans, as well as work on cataloging artifacts for the Park’s collection.  For the Park Historian the intern will research and begin compiling a master list of Appomattox Campaign casualties.  This will also include up updating the Appomattox Court House casualty list.  Some transcription work of letters and diaries may also occur. The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship. The summer internship includes housing at the Park. 
About the National Military Park: The National Park Service unit at Appomattox Court House encompasses 1,700 acres, including the historic village and two Civil War battlefields, numerous cemeteries—military and civilian, several monuments from the commemorative era, and historic structures dating from to the 19th century. The site interprets a wide range of events, including the Appomattox Campaign; the battles of Appomattox Station and Appomattox Court House; the African American and white civilian experience; the surrender and the events/results stemming from the surrender on April 9, 1865.
 
Internship #6 Manassas National Battlefield Park  - POSITION FILLED
Manassas, Virginia
Terms: In partnership with the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, the Manassas National Battlefield Park is seeking an undergraduate intern with a background in nineteenth-century American history to work at the national park. Internship start and end dates will be determined by the NPS supervisor. This internship pays $10 an hour—$4,800 for the summer (40 hrs a week for 12 weeks).
Goals: Duties will be determined by conversations between staff at the Park and at UVA's Nau Civil War Center and may include historical research, frontline interpretation, content development for the park website and social media sites, and curatorial assistance with routine museum housekeeping.  The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship. The summer internship includes housing at the Park.
About the National Battlefield Park: Manassas National Battlefield Park comprises approximately 5,000 acres and preserves the site of two major battles of the American Civil War – the First and Second Battles of Manassas (Bull Run).  Among the park’s historic features are multiple 19th century structures, military and civilian cemeteries, and commemorative monuments.  Areas of interpretive emphasis include: the military events surrounding the First and Second Battles of Manassas (1861 & 1862); how the two battles reflect the transformation of the Civil War in purpose, scale, and method; the experience of civilians, both free and enslaved; and the memorialization of the battlefield landscape.
 
Mount Vernon, VA (This internship offers remote work.)
Terms: Undergraduate student with background in American history. The intern will work directly under the Washington Library’s Center for Digital History (CDH) to advance the Library’s digital research initiatives and broaden public access to the Library’s American Civil War-era collections. The intern will primarily work on two projects. First, the intern will investigate George Washington commemorations installed in public spaces between 1850 and 1870 and incorporate them into a digital database designed to promote research and learning about the historical memory of George Washington. Second, the intern will transcribe Civil War-era letters and documents related to the Washington Family and the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association held in the Library’s manuscript collections, and perform some light annotation. The selected intern should demonstrate strong organizational and analytic skills, ability to work independently, and write clearly. This internship pays $10 an hour--roughly $3,000 for the summer (30 hrs a week for 10 weeks).
Goals: Primary responsibilities include research and data entry in the George Washington Commemorations Project digital database, transcribing Civil War-era letters and documents, light writing assignments, and other tasks to be determined in conjunction with Dr. James P. Ambuske of the Center for Digital History.
Outcome: By the end of the summer, the intern will have a firm foundation in the digital humanities, digital historic preservation, and Mount Vernon in the era of the American Civil War.  The intern will be required to write a 2-page summary of their summer activities at the end of the internship.
Background: The Center for Digital History is the Washington Library's home for digital research, scholarship, and public history. In collaboration with partners at Mount Vernon and beyond, the CDH seeks to expand knowledge about George Washington, Mount Vernon, and America history through digital projects that inform new scholarly research initiatives and teaching opportunities. The Washington Library, a 45,000 square-foot facility, holds Washington’s books and manuscripts, and many additional 18th-century books, as well as thousands of important 19th-century newspapers, manuscripts, and documents. It also serves as a scholarly retreat, creates educational outreach programs, and provides seminars and training programs with a special focus on Washington’s leadership.
 
Charlottesville, Va.
Four internships available for undergraduates and graduate students
Research assistants
Terms: Advanced undergraduates or graduate students with background in American history, History or American Studies major preferred. The intern will work with the President’s Commission on the University in the Age of Segregation on the history of the University of Virginia, 1865-1965. This will involve archival research, document photographing, and professional transcription/editing of historical documents. Intern should demonstrate strong organizational and analytic skills, ability to work independently, and write clearly. These internships pay $10 an hour for undergrads and $15/hr for graduate students.
Goals: Primary responsibilities include archival research, document photographing, and professional documentary transcription (we will train first), proofreading, and writing of descriptive primary document-based essays as part of the university’s public confronting of its own difficult past.
Outcome: The intern will be expected to complete specific tasks as outlined above. At the end of the summer, the intern will have a detailed understanding of both the technical processes involved in archival research, public history, and the post-1865 history of the University of Virginia.
About the Age of Segregation Commission: The President’s Commission on the University in the Age of Segregation will explore and report on UVA’s historical relationship with the era of segregation, especially as it connects to the Charlottesville/Albemarle community. It is co-directed by Andrea Douglas, Executive Director of the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, and Kirt von Daacke, Professor (History) and Assistant Dean, College of Arts & Sciences.
 
Virginia Humanities - ALL POSITIONS FILLED
Charlottesvile, Va.
Two internships available
Research assistants
Up to three research assistants needed for a summer-long, hybrid public history workshop for a small group of slavery descendants, in partnership with their respective ancestral sites. Seeking undergraduates with archival research and digital humanities skills, and foundation in history of American slavery who are comfortable doing archival and government records research.. These internships pay $10 an hour for undergrads and $15/hr for grad students. 
Added 4.2.21; more details to follow. 
 
Richmond, Va.
Two internships available
Internship #1: Archival processing assistant, corporate records POSITION CANCELLED
Terms: Graduate student interested in business history or museum administration. Accuracy and attention to detail required. Legible handwriting is required. This internship pays $15 an hour—roughly $4,500 for the summer. Flexible schedule within the Institution’s 9-5 M-F open hours. Intern must provide own housing.
Goals: Duties will include helping to organize and process the records of a Virginia museum founded in the 1820s. Intern will help inventory, organize and rehouse materials, and update existing indices and finding aids to improve access to the archive and thus highlight its research potential. This internship pays $15/hr for up to 300 hours.
 Outcome: Under the supervision of archival team members, the intern will be part of a major effort to provide better access to and preserve the archives of the Virginia Historical Society. Materials include architectural plans, correspondence, curatorial and exhibition files, facility reports, marketing and fund-raising materials, minutes, publications, etc.
About the VMHC: The Virginia Museum of History and Culture (formerly the Virginia Historical Society) maintains a strong commitment to educational outreach, exhibitions, and other programming, but is perhaps best known for its research library and collections. Those collections include manuscripts (personal and family papers, business and organizational records), printed materials and rare books, and museum artifacts. Among those important holdings are the records of the VMHC itself, documenting the efforts of the founders’ to preserve the records of the Revolutionary period, the institution’s survival through the Civil War, its search for a permanent home, the development of the museum collection and related programming, and the challenges it faces as it navigates the 21st century.
 
Internship #2: Manuscripts processing, Civil War archives POSITION CANCELLED
Terms: Upper-level undergraduate student with a strong history background; familiarity with Virginia Civil War and social history a plus. Accuracy and attention to detail required. This internship is funded by the Nau Center for Civil War History at UVA (and is the same internship as the one advertised above with the other Nau-sponsored internships). This internship pays $10 an hour--roughly $3,000 for the summer.
Goals: Duties will include sorting, arranging, analyzing, re-housing, and describing Civil War-era papers.
Outcome: Under the supervision of archival team members, the intern will be part of a major effort to process a significant group of Civil War-era manuscripts, with the goal of producing finding aids that will guide researchers to the materials.
Background: The Virginia Museum of History and Culture (formerly Virginia Historical Society) maintains a strong commitment to educational outreach, exhibitions, and other programming, but is perhaps best known for its research library and collections. Those collections include manuscripts (personal and family papers, business and organizational records), printed materials and rare books, and museum artifacts. A commitment to preservation of and access to its richest resources has led to an initiative to process these materials.